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"Words can lie or clarify" by Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga

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Social Studies +2 Age Levels Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)

In 1981, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga submitted a memorandum on the subject “Use of term ‘concentration camps’” to the executive director of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). Included in this collection is background information on the Japanese American Incarceration era and Executive Order 9066, alongside Herzig-Yoshinaga's own words. In response to reading through this memorandum, students can apply Project Zero Thinking Routines to what they already know about the Japanese American Incarceration era and what interests them for further research. Additionally, students can begin to connect ideas from Herzig-Yoshinaga's memorandum to artifacts, documents and photographs of the era, noting especially the nuances in the meaning of words used and interpret some of these euphemisms in context.

#APA2018

Related collection of interest around language found within the Civilian Exclusion Order: Document Analysis: Civilian Exclusion Order and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

Think / Puzzle / Explore: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access

W.R.A. Leave Pass, Teiji Okuda, No. 15771

National Museum of American History

baggage tag, Yuba City CA, 1942

National Museum of American History

Identification button

National Museum of American History

Ruth Asawa internment camp ID

National Portrait Gallery

Poster, "Lets Relocate to Illinois

National Museum of American History

War Ration Book #4

National Museum of American History

Rejection letter from Yale University

National Museum of American History

Compromise Settlement

National Museum of American History

Immunization card

National Museum of American History

Letter Regarding Re-Application to Yale

National Museum of American History

Short-Term Leave Authorization, WRA

National Museum of American History

Pamphlet, "70,000 American Refugees - Made in USA"

National Museum of American History

Resident I.D. card

National Museum of American History

Letter from Yale acknowledging enrollment at Harvard

National Museum of American History

Letter from friend concerning admission to Yale

National Museum of American History

Evacuee Center Regulations, Evacuation Notice

National Museum of American History

Letter from Margaret Hayashi to Mr. Hayes

National Museum of American History

Letter from Margaret Hayashi to Mr. Hayes

National Museum of American History