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College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards
 

Portrait Analysis: Lili'oukalani

In this activity, students will analyze a portrait of Lili'oukalani (1838-1917), the last monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaii.  Queen Lili'uokalani came to the throne after her brother's death in 1891 and ruled until 1893 when, to avoid bloodshed, she surrendered to a coup led by American business leaders.  Opportunities to learn more include other portraits of Lili'uokalani, including one taken when she was 15, an article about her life and the annexation of Hawaii, and more.

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying Lili'uokalani's life and achievements, Hawaiian annexation, Hawaiian history and culture, and more.  This activity opens with questions from the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators and ends with a Project Zero Think / Puzzle / Explore routine; the full portraiture guide and routine instructions are located at the end of the collection.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: liliuokalani, hawai'i, polynesian, pacific islander

#APA2018 #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
11
 

Triumph and Tragedy: Exploring World War I through Transcription

This collection brings together Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2019, "Triumph and Tragedy in History." #NHD2019

These resources - including photographs, museum objects, newspapers, diaries, administrative records, pamphlets, and correspondence - explore the varying military and civilian experiences during World War One. Resources highlight what the Great War was like for soldiers, and how the military experience differed for African Americans and whites during a time of legalized segregation and racism in the United States. Other materials featured include diary entries, correspondence, and publications discussing the impact of WWI -both during and after the war- on the home front.  Many of these primary and secondary sources were featured as projects on the Smithsonian Transcription Center, and have been fully transcribed by digital volunteers--making these collections easier to read, search, and explore. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research. 

Smithsonian Transcription Center
51
 

Six Degrees of Separation: An APUSH Review Activity

Use this collection as a starting point for an AP United States History review activity that emphasizes connections and cause-and-effect. Students will copy the collection and add in four resources that form a chain of connection from one item to another (ending with six resources total). For each resource, they should add an annotation describing each of the events or items included, analyzing any important details in the resources themselves, and explaining how each connects to the next one.
Hattie Petty
2
 

How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time?

Thomas Jefferson is remembered for his contributions to the ideals of natural rights and democratic principles.  Yet, as a slave owner,  Jefferson personally lived in contradiction of those  principles. In this Learning Lab you'll explore how Thomas Jefferson is viewed at different times in history through portraiture. Using evidence from his portraits you'll answer the question, "How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time."

Laura Nicosia
3
 

Portrait Analysis: Duke Kahanamoku

In this activity, students will analyze a stamp depicting Duke Kahanamoku to explore his significance in American history and culture. Duke Kahanamoku (1890-1968) transformed the Polynesian pastime of surfing into a worldwide competitive sport.  He also won five Olympic medals in swimming, was an accomplished actor and businessman, and was re-elected sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu for thirteen consecutive terms.  Opportunities to learn more include a photograph of him with Amelia Earhart and her husband, a surfboard he carved, and a Google Doodle created for his 125th birthday.

This activity can be used as an entry point into studying Duke Kahanamoku's life and achievements, Hawaiian history and culture, and more.  This activity opens with questions from the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators and ends with a Project Zero Think / Puzzle / Explore routine; the full portraiture guide and routine instructions are located at the end of the collection.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: surfer, pacific islander, athlete, hawaii, hawai'i

#APA2018

#visiblethinking

Tess Porter
11
 

Patriotic or Protest: Minority American Experience

This collection, outlined by interactive activities on each portrait, questions the American Experience for the minority voice in the United States of America. Acts of Patriotism and Protest are not new, but how do they connect to the full American Experience that is often ignored? What is the 1st Amendment of the United States to the minority voice?

Blake Olvera
13
 

How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time?

Thomas Jefferson is remembered for his contributions to the ideals of natural rights and democratic principles.  Yet, as a slave owner,  Jefferson personally lived in contradiction of those  principles. In this Learning Lab you'll explore how Thomas Jefferson is viewed at different times in history through portraiture. Using evidence from his portraits you'll answer the question, "How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time."

Dave Klippel
3