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College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards
 

Educating for Global Competence with Contemporary Asian Art

What is global competence?  What are the skills and dispositions of globally competent students?  What role can art play in educating students for global competence?  Teachers can use this Learning Lab Collection as a resource for students to explore themes of global importance in the arts of Asia.  The Collection features two works of contemporary Asian art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with several tools for students to examine and reflect about the works of art, such as Visible Thinking Routines,  Artful Thinking Routines, or Global Thinking Routines.  For each routine, the rationale and  process is described to help the teacher practice.  The Collection also includes artist interviews and other contextual information about the works of art for teachers and students to deepen their understanding.

This Learning Lab Collection was created to support the The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) National Teachers of the Year 2018 program.  CCSSO is a nonpartisan, nationwide, nonprofit organization of public officials who head departments of elementary and secondary education in the states, the District of Columbia, the Department of Defense Education Activity, the Bureau of Indian Education and the five U.S. extra-state jurisdictions.  Learn more at https://www.ccsso.org/

Essential Questions to be addressed by this Learning Lab Collection:

  • What are some practical tools teachers can use to look closely and reflect about works of art?
  • How can we use works of art to prepare students to understand the world and participate in it?
  • How do we define global competence and globally competent students?

#NTOY18

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Asian; Asia; Freer|Sackler; Project Zero; Global Competence; Global Competency; Visible Thinking; Artful Thinking; Chalk Talk; See-Think-Wonder; 3Ys; 3-2-1 Bridge; Contemporary Asian Art; China; India; Monkeys; Religion; Architecture; Chinese Cultural Revolution; Xu Bing; Terminal; Subodh Gupta; Sculpture; Lacquer; Wood; Brass 

Freer and Sackler Galleries
22
 

Discovering Four Asian Countries Through Celadon Ceramics

In this collection, beautiful celadon ceramic pieces are used to help students explore the art of Celadon. While learning more about the ceramics students will also
 explore the following things: kingdoms, personal objects of value, burial practices, cultural similarities and differences, religious and ceremonial pieces, political influence, kings and noble men,  dynasties, artistry, skilled craftsmanship, treasures, geography and the continent of Asia.

This collection is not comprehensive but hopefully will serve as a starting point to encourage students to research and study  more  about some aspect of Asian-related ceramics, arts, geography, history, cultures, customs or trade . Hopefully  it will encourage interest and value in  field trips to Museums such as the Smithsonian Freer Gallery, as well as short-term /long-term study abroad trips to Asian countries.


Eniola O
14
 

Christmas Past and Present for First Grade

How did families celebrate Christmas then and now?

1.H.1.2 Explain the importance of folklore and celebrations and their impact on local communities.


Christina Hawkins
6
 

Triumph and Tragedy: Exploring World War I through Transcription

This collection brings together Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2019, "Triumph and Tragedy in History." #NHD2019

These resources - including photographs, museum objects, newspapers, diaries, administrative records, pamphlets, and correspondence - explore the varying military and civilian experiences during World War One. Resources highlight what the Great War was like for soldiers, and how the military experience differed for African Americans and whites during a time of legalized segregation and racism in the United States. Other materials featured include diary entries, correspondence, and publications discussing the impact of WWI -both during and after the war- on the home front.  Many of these primary and secondary sources were featured as projects on the Smithsonian Transcription Center, and have been fully transcribed by digital volunteers--making these collections easier to read, search, and explore. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research. 

Smithsonian Transcription Center
51
 

Six Degrees of Separation: An APUSH Review Activity

Use this collection as a starting point for an AP United States History review activity that emphasizes connections and cause-and-effect. Students will copy the collection and add in four resources that form a chain of connection from one item to another (ending with six resources total). For each resource, they should add an annotation describing each of the events or items included, analyzing any important details in the resources themselves, and explaining how each connects to the next one.
Hattie Petty
2
 

Patriotic or Protest: Minority American Experience

This collection, outlined by interactive activities on each portrait, questions the American Experience for the minority voice in the United States of America. Acts of Patriotism and Protest are not new, but how do they connect to the full American Experience that is often ignored? What is the 1st Amendment of the United States to the minority voice?

Blake Olvera
13
 

Rhea's Letters: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool Award.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

Abraham's Letters: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool Award.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

Hong's Letters: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool Award.

Smithsonian Libraries
10