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Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)
 

Culture and Aesthetics Meet Physics: Why Soviet and American Spacesuits Look Different

This collection was developed as part of the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program under the theme of “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.” It has been modified by Jodi Halligan to use as a learning activity on observing differences between Soviet and American space suits and related technology and design.

Jodi Halligan
15
 

MicroObservatory: A guide to Observing the Universe

MicroObservatory is a network of automated telescopes that can be controlled over the Internet. In this collection, students will learn how they can control these telescopes themselves, using many of the same technologies that NASA uses to capture astronomical images by controlling telescopes in space. After gathering their very own images of space, students will learn the steps professional astronomers take to process the astronomical masterpieces so often seen from NASA, and then have the opportunity to create their very own!

Jessica Radovich
6
 

MicroObservatory: A guide to Observing the Universe

MicroObservatory is a network of automated telescopes that can be controlled over the Internet. In this collection, students will learn how they can control these telescopes themselves, using many of the same technologies that NASA uses to capture astronomical images by controlling telescopes in space. After gathering their very own images of space, students will learn the steps professional astronomers take to process the astronomical masterpieces so often seen from NASA, and then have the opportunity to create their very own!

Erika Wright
6
 

Nature: Botanical Expressions

At the turn of the 20th century, the intersection of botanical study with design practice stimulated an array of plant forms and motifs in furnishings, glassware, ceramics, textiles, and more. Botanical Expressions reveals how designers, inspired by nature and informed by scientific knowledge, created vibrant new designs in America, Britain, France, and the Netherlands. Blossoming vases, plantlike stuctures, fanciful garden illustrations, and a diversity of vegetal and floral patterns reveal how nature and design dynamically merged.

An increasing number of designers, trained as botanists, advocated for the beauty and order of nature’s systems, colors, and patterns. Many manufacturers operated in proximity to gardens for natural study and stocked books of botanical illustrations as resources for their designers. These primary sources, on loan from Smithsonian Libraries, appear alongside the objects they influenced.

Since the 19th century, the garden was often seen as a refuge from industry and a natural source of plenty and pleasure. This history of botanical expressions in design illuminates a reflection on the critical role of nature within our world.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
67
 

Water-Related Hazards: Hurricanes

This topical collection includes resources about water-related hazards and natural disasters, namely hurricanes. Includes examples from around the world and over time, including Hurricane Ike in Texas and the Greater Antilles, Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast, and Hurricane Sandy in the Northeastern region of the United States. Finally, a lesson plan asking students to design a post-hurricane revitalization plan is included.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Aral Sea: Exploring Change Over Time with Satellite Imagery

This teaching collection includes maps and satellite images, complemented by image interpretation guides and related magazine articles, for students to discover what natural causes and human impacts have had consequences for the Aral Sea. The Aral Sea has been a continuously shrinking body of water over the last 50 years after the rivers that fed into it were diverted by irrigation projects. Learn what you can discover by annotating change through satellite imagery.
Ashley Naranjo
17
 

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer

The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers' bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers' 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join STEM in 30 as we investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and into the history books.

December 14, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
34
 

Narwhal: Revealing an Arctic Legend

These resources were developed for use with the Smithsonian's exhibition Narwhal; Revealing an Arctic Legend. For more information about this traveling exhibition, please visit the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES).

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
50
 

ACCESS SERIES | Through the Lens of Curiosity

IMPORTANT: Click on the "i" for information icon and the paperclip icons as you move through the collection.

All Access Club Explores the Microscopic World. If you cannot see something, does that mean that it is not there? Nope! Just lurking under the surface of common, everyday objects is an entire world that we normally cannot see. People just like you can use microscopes to discover things that need magnification in order to view.  The collection is part of an activity series that explores this mysterious microscopic world.

EDUCATORS | For the LESSON PLAN of the original "Through the Lens of Curiosity"  << CLICK HERE >>

In this collection you will:

  • Find out about the world through the use of microscopes and magnifiers
  • Take on the role of detective as you embark on a quest to solve 5 mysteries -- by making observations about up-close objects and reading clues, can you figure out what the whole object is?
  • In the game A Part of the Whole, use your power of observation to consider the structures and functions of up-close objects to guess what they might be. Again, you will look at part of an object--photographed up-close--to guess at the whole.

If it is possible to set-up a hand's-on experience with microscopes along with the online activities -- the tactile portion will enhance the online activity. Teens can also view a video about scanning electron microscopes by a young scientist in the 'extension section'.

Keywords: decision-making, self-determination, access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program 

Tracie Spinale
64
 

Examining Evidence: What happens to the body in space?

Students analyze data about what has happened to astronauts’ bodies during their time in microgravity and their return to Earth. These changes are categorized into four sets: Staying Strong, Getting Oriented, Sleeping, and Fluid Shift.

National Air and Space Museum Education
16
 

Behind Design: Inka Bridge

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture?

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, INCA BRIDGE, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In or See Think Wonder. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Weaving the Bridge at Q'eswacha. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
32
 

Behind Design: Exploring Culture Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture?

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors and/or restrictions influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, traditions, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation?  *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
30
 

Lactase Persistence and Human Migration

How can genetics help us to understand human migration? In this collection, students will use maps, articles, and videos to analyze genetics research about lactase persistence before building their own maps to understand the co-evolution of genes and culture. 

This collection can be used in a Biology classroom with units on enzymes, genetics and/or human evolution, in an interdisciplinary unit to link Math with Biology (students to use ratios, statistics, and data to build a map) or in a Geography course.

Students should be either given a color copy of the lactase persistence map or it could be projected. Once students have been given the time and opportunity to look at the map, the following questions should be asked.

  1. What do you notice about this map?
  2. What questions do you have about this map?
  3. What can this map show us about human migration?

Next, ask students to work in groups, each choose one of the following three articles to read, then share a brief summary of their article with those in their group. These articles are excellent resources that provide different perspectives on lactase persistence and evolution. The first article (the source of the lactase persistence map) provides a clear explanation of what we can learn from milk fats found on ancient pottery shards and the link between lactase persistence and migration. The second article focuses on animal domestication and the third on the nutritional benefits of being able to digest lactase as a selective advantage.

The third article also connects lactase persistence, the shift to agricultural communities, and human migration with the genetics of human skin color. This could provide an opportunity for students to discuss the inheritance of skin color and perhaps skin color and race. A separate collection has been made to help discuss this and can be found here.

In the activity section, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute BioInteractive (HHMI) video summarizes some key aspects about the genetics of lactase persistence as well as some of the history. If students have already read and shared out to show understanding, the video could be used to meet the needs of students who tend to be more auditory learners. The activity “Patterns in the Distribution of Lactase Persistence,” also from HHMI, guides students though an understanding of the co-evolution of genes and culture. “Students analyze data obtained from published lactase-persistence studies involving many populations sampled around the world. The activity involves calculating percentages, drawing pie charts, plotting the pie charts on a world map, and analyzing the data. This lesson provides an interdisciplinary approach to studying lactase persistence, connecting biological concepts and data analysis to world geography and culture”. (https://www.biointeractive.org/sites/default/files/Patterns-in-the-Distribution-of-Lactase-Persistence-Educator.pdf)

The map the students create can be compared to the initial image provided (a map of lactase persistence) as well as the information provided by the Smithsonian Magazine articles to predict the path of human migration. Based on the initial map, reading and activity, students can show their understanding of the connection between genetics and human migration by using the Project Zero thinking routine ‘Claim, Support, Question’. Claims can be made based on their new knowledge and then supported with evidence from the map, reading or activity. Then, students can pose questions for further research or discussion.

In the additional resource section, a YouTube clip has been provided to further extend the conversation. Sarah Tishkoff, from the earlier HHMI video, does an excellent job explaining the co-evolution of culture and the gene for lactase persistence.

Emily Veres
10
 

Climate Change and Migration

What will the future reveal about our choices and attitudes toward the natural world? This collection uses the painting 'Mamakadendagwad' by Tom Uttech and two Project Zero routines, ‘Ten Times Two’ and ‘Unveiling Stories,’ to start or continue a dialogue about the impact of humans on the environment. 

“Tom Uttech's visionary paintings emerge from a deep sense of communion with nature. As an accomplished birdwatcher, conservationist, wildlife photographer, and hiker, Uttech (born 1942) has spent his life engaging with the unspoiled wilderness of his native Wisconsin and the neighboring woodlands of northern Minnesota and Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada. Yet while Uttech's experience of the landscape is grounded in firsthand knowledge and close observation, his paintings do not represent specific scenes. Instead, he uses his understanding of the ecosystem's animals, plant life, light, and atmospheres to conjure fantastic reconstructions of the natural world.”. (https://americanart.si.edu/artwork/mamakadendagwad-110761

Climate change is expected to cause larger migrations both within and across borders - displacing individuals from their homes. This movement is the result of many complex factors such as: sea level rise, desertification, extreme weather events, etc. While humans are certainly impacted by climate change, so are other living organisms.  

This collection can be used in several classroom settings: Biology (ecology unit or any units that address human impact on the environment or relationships between living organisms), IBDP Environmental Systems and Societies (many connections with content throughout the course), AP Environmental Science (many connections with content throughout the course), Theory of Knowledge (when exploring the Natural Sciences Area of Knowledge or exploring knowledge claims about evidence), or Geography. 

This collection could be used at the start, middle or end of a unit as there are valuable connections possible at any point; however, I think this would be a fantastic starting image for a unit. In the absence of any context of what is being learned in class, students may come up with a larger variety of observations and perhaps a more emotional connection with the painting.

Annotations attached to the painting provide information on how to guide student exploration with each of the thinking routines. 

Extension: The first additional resource is a map showing the average direction mammals, birds, and amphibians need to move to track hospitable climates as they shift across the landscape. The following three articles are related to the moving map and should be used along with the map. Teachers could start with this moving map before showing the painting depending on their students’ level of interest and knowledge. Another extension could be analyzing data to draw conclusions about how migration changes biodiversity in various ecosystems. The last article from National Geographic explains that “…as the planet warms, species are shifting where, when, and how they thrive. They are moving up slopes and toward the poles. That is already altering what people can eat; sparking new disease risks; upending key industries; and changing how entire cultures use the land and sea”. (https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/04/climate-change-species-migration-disease/) Each of these articles highlight an aspect of the complexity of climate change and its impacts on the environment. 

Emily Veres
10
 

Climate Change and Human Impact on the Environment

What will the future reveal about the choices we are making and our attitudes toward the natural world? How might future generations judge these choices and attitudes? This collection uses the painting ‘Manifest Destiny’ by Alexis Rockman and two Project Zero routines, ‘See/Think/Wonder’ and ‘Unveiling Stories,’ to start or continue a dialogue about the impact of humans on the environment. 

“Alexis Rockman is a contemporary American painter known for his fantastical paintings of dystopian natural environments”. (http://www.artnet.com/artists/alexis-rockman/) He depicts the future where creatures struggle to survive toxic conditions and invasive species. In Rockman’s paintings we see an absence of human beings, only the altered landscapes they have left behind. (https://www.artworksforchange.org/portfolio/alexis-rockman/)

Climate change is expected to cause larger migrations both within and across borders - displacing individuals from their homes. This movement is the result of many complex factors such as: sea level rise, desertification, extreme weather events, etc. There is a direct impact on availability of resources such as food and clean water as well as a crisis of public health. 

This collection can be used in several classroom settings: Biology (ecology unit or any units that address human impact on the environment), IBDP Environmental Systems and Societies (many connections with content throughout the course), AP Environmental Science (many connections with content throughout the course), Theory of Knowledge (when exploring the Natural Sciences Area of Knowledge or exploring knowledge claims about evidence), or Geography.

This collection could be used at the start, middle or end of a unit as there are valuable connections possible at any point. An interesting interdisciplinary exploration that I have seen in the middle school Science setting is for students to visit local waterways affected by human impacts and take samples back to their lab to test for pH, phosphorus, etc. Then, students read about the importance of water ways in the spread of humans in their humanities or language class before writing poetry about the human impact on the environment in their second language class (half of the students took French while the other half took Spanish). 

Manifest Destiny could be integrated at any point during the interdisciplinary unit. For example, in the beginning to encourage questions or determine previous knowledge, the middle to spark curiosity, or at the end after students have more information about human impacts on the environment.

In addition to or in place of visiting a local waterway, a link to an interactive map can be found in the additional resources section of this collection. Students can research what communities will be impacted by rising water levels. A scale bar allows users to shift the water levels and observe changes to the area. A possible extension could be to consider how vulnerable communities tend to be the most impacted by water level rise. Two articles included within the additional resource collection provide perspectives from the United States and Australia.

Annotations attached to the painting provide information on how to guide student exploration with each of the thinking routines. Annotations attached to each website include possible questions to consider when using each additional resource. 

Emily Veres
9
 

Mars

A current elementary or middle school student will most likely be the first human to step foot on Mars. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will investigate the plans to send humans to Mars and the ongoing research into water and the possibility of life on the Red Planet.

October 21, 2015


This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Katelyn Schmidt
28
 

How might we re-design our classroom?

This collection begins with the analysis of a series of images from 19th and 20th century classroom settings. Next, learners will apply Agency by Design thinking routines to explore elements of their own classroom that could be re-designed. Learners will go through the design process to: 

  • identify the precise challenge
  • brainstorm a solution, and
  • create a prototype.

This lesson introduces the design process to learners through a familiar system, the classroom. It allows for learners to collaborate in the improvement and re-design of their own learning environment, while taking into account the needs of other users of the space. 


This collection was created as an example used in the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Design" session at the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Learning Institute. 

Ashley Naranjo
21
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Jamie Mauldin
10
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Jamie Mauldin
10
 

Examining Evidence: What happens to the body in space?

Students analyze data about what has happened to astronauts’ bodies during their time in microgravity and their return to Earth. These changes are categorized into four sets: Staying Strong, Getting Oriented, Sleeping, and Fluid Shift.

Rebecca Prochilo
16
 

Aztecs and Coding

Here is a collection of coding games using Scratch interactive media using MakeyMakey , integrating Aztec games, culture and information.

In this collection, I am going to highlight Aztec games and culture to recreate  projects that I do in my my own design classroom with my students based on these historical artifacts.

This collection is hopefully an inspiration for young designers and artists to use designs inspired by the Aztec games and culture to make a Scratch game or remix with the examples I have posted in this collection.  This collection shows you a pathway to create coding and designs based on these  Aztec games and culture,  to create games similar in motif and structure to the originals. (This lesson is more focused on 9-18 year olds, but can be adapted for older students, as well as adults with some rewriting and restructuring, especially with coding aspect of the lesson.)

 You will be creating and studying these cultural artifacts to gain insight into how they were constructed, drawn, and fabricated. In order to gain perspective on these  cultures, the research your students use by viewing and constructing their own coded games/designs will give agency to their work, albeit through the eyes of these  people. The students will gain a new understanding and vision of these  cultural motifs and what they carry to the viewer.

Students will be creating and researching designs and motifs based on this culture. Once they have constructed and drawn an idea either through digital or non-digital means, they will be rendering their designs in Scratch or another coding app like Processing

The students will then use these coded games with MakeyMakey and a create a controller like these musical instruments/controllers my students created at Labz at my school Charter High School for Architecture and Design in Philadelphia.

Happy Coding!


#LatinoHAC

Christopher Sweeney
27
 

Korean Ceramics

This collection is for the introduction and exploration of Korean Culture. Ceramics, Birds, and Plants. Throughout the project students will research and  create Korean inspired pottery art. This collection is dedicated to the exploration of Korean Ewer's and Ceramics during the Goryeo Era (12-14 century). The collection starts off with brief discussion about Korea and its culture and then moves onto discuss the history of Korea Ewers and Ceramics. The students will then choose and research a Korean Bird and Flower that will become the design on their pinch pot they make the following week. The second week introduces students to the study of Korean Celadon Designs and Symbols especially birds and phoenixes they will then learn about clay and sculpting of a pinch pot. During the third week students will learn in depth about Celadon pottery and chose a shade of Celadon to paint their own piece of pottery. On the Last week students will review the scope of the project learn about inlaid designs and inlay their bird and flower design in black on their pottery. Lastly, students can then write a story about the transformation of their bird through good deeds into a phoenix. 

Caryn Michael
50
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

"The World of Your Senses": Parallel Perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and Western Science on Sensory Perception

"The World of Your Senses" shares parallel perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and western science on sensory perception. This collection explores the questions: How do we see? How does hearing work? How do we perceive smell? How does taste function? How do we sense touch? In addition, the Buddhist perspective includes a sixth sense... mind consciousness!

"The World of Your Senses" is the result of many years of work growing out of directives from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his long history engaging Western scientists in dialogue. The script, content, and imagery were envisioned by a dedicated and curiosity-filled group of thirty Tibetan Buddhist monastics-in-exile from monasteries and nunneries in India, through the "Science for Monks and Nuns" program. The creation of the physical exhibit, launched in 2010, was supported through a unique collaboration between the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LWTA in Dharamsala, India), the Sager Family Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (SCEMS/SCLDA & OEC/Smithsonian Exhibitions), and the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It has since traveled to the United States, Nepal, and Bhutan.

The resource is bi-lingual: English and Tibetan.

RELATED COLLECTIONS:

Senses Series – Sight in Humans and Animals      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/n2f39XxkfBRJeHPk)

Senses Series – Hearing      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7EbVTM49NgWiGrzA)

Senses Series – Smell      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7LjjBHybUk9HE8Wj)

Senses Series – Taste     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/2w7r7PVoAgghiYmL)

Senses Series – Touch     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/oon5rHojeyrEwNEE)


This collection is based Science For Monks, World of Your Senses (2010).

Tracie Spinale
28
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