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Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initiative: Mathematics Standards
 

Oh, You're Just Full of Hot Air: Hot Air Balloons and Air Pressure

Has anyone ever told you that you're full of hot air? How is hot air different from cooler air? This fast-paced webcast will look at how hot air balloons float and how a change in air pressure affects them.

March 18, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
23
 

Please Do Touch the Paintings: Hands-on Art Projects from NMAAHC (Still Life)

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore still life creation through Charles Ethan Porter's piece Still Life with Roses (ca. 1885-87). 

Still life provides an avenue for exploration and observation unlike any other genre of visual art. Studying still life arrangements can be a great introduction to geometric analysis and spatial awareness for young minds. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about nineteenth-century painter, Charles Ethan Porter, and his approach to still life painting while trying their hand at arranging their own still life! The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their ability to follow instructions and hone their skills in observation, spatial analysis, and creative expression. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is a still life?
  • How can artists express themselves and tell stories through still life works?
  • What are some connections between art and mathematical principles?
  • How can we explore geometry through arranging a still life?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
10
 

Design It Yourself: Design an Interior Space

Follow along to design a model of an interior space inspired by the work of IwamotoScott Architecture, 2019 National Design Award winner for Interior Design. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

Design it Yourself: Potato Stamp Pattern Making Inspired by Eva Zeisel

Get to know the life and work of designer Eva Zeisel. Use her motifs and patterns as inspiration to design your own tessellating pattern using a potato stamp and acrylic paint!

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
23
 

Geometry of Flight

This collection is a short geometry lesson supplement themed with various aspects of flight to provide real world examples; it contains pictures, videos, and practice problems (as well as links to further practice problems). It includes volume and surface area of rectangular and triangular prisms, basic Pythagorean theorem and trigonometry, and the volume and surface area of cones, cylinders, and pyramids.
Goal: Students will better understand how to find the volume and surface area of rectangular and triangular prisms, basic Pythagorean theorem and trigonometry, and how to find the the volume and surface area of cones, cylinders, and pyramids.
Tags: Flight, space, aeronautic, geometry, volume, surface area, rectangular prisms, triangular prisms, prism, cylinder, cone, pyramid, Pythagorean theorem, right triangles, trigonometry, sin, cos, tan
Jade Lintott
71
 

Picasso for kids

A collection of portraits for students at the elementary.  

Images are the resources to be used in teaching a STEAM lesson.  

Damaris Fernandez-Rodriguez
5
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Jamie Mauldin
10
 

Cuba and Cubism / Lam and picasso #latinohac

Damaris Fernandez-Rodriguez
9
 

Aztecs and Coding

Here is a collection of coding games using Scratch interactive media using MakeyMakey , integrating Aztec games, culture and information.

In this collection, I am going to highlight Aztec games and culture to recreate  projects that I do in my my own design classroom with my students based on these historical artifacts.

This collection is hopefully an inspiration for young designers and artists to use designs inspired by the Aztec games and culture to make a Scratch game or remix with the examples I have posted in this collection.  This collection shows you a pathway to create coding and designs based on these  Aztec games and culture,  to create games similar in motif and structure to the originals. (This lesson is more focused on 9-18 year olds, but can be adapted for older students, as well as adults with some rewriting and restructuring, especially with coding aspect of the lesson.)

 You will be creating and studying these cultural artifacts to gain insight into how they were constructed, drawn, and fabricated. In order to gain perspective on these  cultures, the research your students use by viewing and constructing their own coded games/designs will give agency to their work, albeit through the eyes of these  people. The students will gain a new understanding and vision of these  cultural motifs and what they carry to the viewer.

Students will be creating and researching designs and motifs based on this culture. Once they have constructed and drawn an idea either through digital or non-digital means, they will be rendering their designs in Scratch or another coding app like Processing

The students will then use these coded games with MakeyMakey and a create a controller like these musical instruments/controllers my students created at Labz at my school Charter High School for Architecture and Design in Philadelphia.

Happy Coding!


#LatinoHAC

Christopher Sweeney
27
 

3D Printing/ Printmaking with Latin American Designs

This collection is hopefully an inspiration for young designers and artist to use designs and motifs from Mexico, Peru, Panama, and Guatemala. This collection shows you a pathway to create designs based on these motifs and artwork to use in 3D printing using  Morphi and other tools to create prints using relief printing making techniques. (This lesson is more focused on 9-18 year olds, but can be adapted for older students, as well as adults with some rewriting and restructuring. I also have run the printmaking section with younger students, but with the 3D relief plates already being printed, or facilitated by adults, teachers, or parents to help them with the process so as to make it a successful lesson. )

 You will be creating and studying these cultural artifacts to gain insight into how they were constructed, drawn, and fabricated. Ours of course are totally opposite of how these fabric fragments and other examples were constructed, but they can help a student (and yourself ) gain insight into the process that these cultures used to created these designs, art and patterns within the drawings. In order to gain perspective on these cultures, the research your students use by viewing and constructing their own designs will give agency to their work, albeit through the eyes of these ancient craftsman, designer, and artist. The students will gain a new understanding and vision of these cultural motifs and what they carry to the viewer.

Students will be creating and researching geometric designs and motifs based on ancient to modern patterns from Peru, Mexico, and other areas. Once they have constructed and drawn an idea either through digital or non-digital means, they will be rendering their designs in Morphi or another 3D modeling app. Here is a link to a design I did specifically for this lesson on Youmagine that you can use with your prints, as well as your students.

The students will then export these files to be 3D sliced for the printer. I suggest using Cura as this is my go to software for getting digital files ready for the 3D printer. Depending on your press, I suggest making the geometric design small and thin enough that they fit in your print bed, so you might need to resize the design in Cura. If you do not own press, you can use tools to do relief prints like you would any regular printmaking project.Iif you have access, you can use the OpenPressProject to print your own, which I highly recommend as it is my preferred method that I printed my designs in the last resource of this collection.

The inking process should be similar to regular relief printmaking, depending on your students design complexity, and you can experiment with texture, motifs, multiple plates, etc. based on the  resources that are in this collection.

Happy Printing!

#LatinoHAC

Christopher Sweeney
43
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

Caught in the Folds

Students will look at geometry in origami as an inspiration to art, design, and innovations in science.

Using selected Issey Miyake’s fashion designs and connections to origami this Learning Lab Collection will highlight artworks that are designed in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) forms, how to plan/engineer for complexity, and how combinations make a difference in the end product.

Description

Student Instructions

Teacher Notes

Slide 1: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Tank

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz

Encourage students to watch the video more than once.

Slide 2: 2D paper crane

Read about history of the paper crane and cultural significance.

These two slides are visualizations that can help students make connections between origami and Miyake’s work.

Slide 3: 3D paper crane

Slide 4: Origami instructions for paper crane.

Make the crane twice.

One version keep in the 3D form

Second version: Unfold and analyze the line features. If you need to you can use a ruler to accent the lines.

Identify the parallel line properties, types of angles, and any special features of the folds.

Extensions: Make connections between the folds and the aspects of the crane.

Slide 5: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Long Skirt

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz, and sketch a rough draft of the 2D plan for the skirt.

Students can watch the video of the skirt a couple of times, answer the questions in the quiz and sketch the skirt. Remind the students that it does not have to be perfect. The goal is to identify the shapes used.

Slide 6: In-Ei Mendori

Students will interview each other and make predictions of what the 2D version of the sculpture will look like.

It is important that they complete the quiz before advancing to the next slide.

Slide 7: In-Ei Mendori

Students will evaluate their prediction of the sculpture.

Possible point for class discussion.

Slide 8: Thinking routine

With your group members answer the questions for one of the Miyake designs.

Slide 9: 40 under 40: Erik Demaine

Watch the video of folding.

Read Erik Dermaine’s short biography and research interests

Students will read about Dermaine’s interests and do some research on the applications of geometry.

Slide 10: Science Innovations

Watch the video on science innovations.

Lead a discussion on the aspects of origami and the importance in problem solving in science.

EXTENSIONS

Slide 11: Fold it website

Connections between biology and origami.

Read through the website and use the folding tool.

Students could make proteins with origami paper and analyse the different line properties and relationships that are on the paper after unfolded.

Additional resources

Documentary on origami- teachers can watch for more background information or use clips during the lesson. 

Article: http://www.opb.org/artsandlife...

#visiblethinking

Amanda Riske
12
 

Math and Measurement: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

Unpacking Sol LeWitt’s Open Cubes

Students will analyze Sol LeWitt's variations of the open cube to apply their knowledge of drawing cubes using isometric paper and nets of cubes. Students will extend their knowledge of surface area while observing LeWitt's Cube without a cube and make a generalization for two formulas.

This is an activity for a grade 6 or 7 geometry class. Prerequisite knowledge: volume, surface area and nets of cubes.

Students can do the work in groups of 2-3 there are sections for thinking routines and prompts for students to upload photos of their work.

Amanda Riske
8
 

Geometry of Flight

This collection is a short geometry lesson supplement themed with various aspects of flight to provide real world examples; it contains pictures, videos, and practice problems (as well as links to further practice problems). It includes volume and surface area of rectangular and triangular prisms, basic Pythagorean theorem and trigonometry, and the volume and surface area of cones, cylinders, and pyramids.
Goal: Students will better understand how to find the volume and surface area of rectangular and triangular prisms, basic Pythagorean theorem and trigonometry, and how to find the the volume and surface area of cones, cylinders, and pyramids.
Tags: Flight, space, aeronautic, geometry, volume, surface area, rectangular prisms, triangular prisms, prism, cylinder, cone, pyramid, Pythagorean theorem, right triangles, trigonometry, sin, cos, tan
Eminem
71