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Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initiative: English/Language Arts Standards
 

What Will You Stand For? Video Resources

Throughout American History, young people have led, influenced, and defined the outcomes of our elections and politics. By organizing, lobbying, advocating, protesting, and voting, young voices supply our democracy with a never-ending source of fresh ideas, concerns, and hopes. This tradition continues today, as voters ages 18 to 24 make up the biggest potential voting bloc in modern elections.

This Learning Lab collection can be used in conjunction with a short video that challenges young people to reflect on and discuss “What will you stand for?” Find the video and additional resources here: https://historyexplorer.si.edu...

This video is part of a series of short films from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History that looks at how young people have historically shaped public opinion and outcomes. These brief videos help young people learn from the civic actions of youth in the past to become thoughtful, informed, and active participants in their democracy today. Through historical stories of youth engaged in our elections and politics, these videos show how youth have made history through civic action and challenge today’s young people to continue shaping their democracy. 

National Museum of American History
33
 

Teaching with Haitian Art and Heritage with Frost Collection

Understanding Haitian Culture though Art

This lesson will support teaching Haitian traditions and culture through the Frost Art Museum collections. It will also provide a look into cultural identity, Haitianite supported by research conducted by two FIU faculty members .  The PowerPoint will expand on Haitian history and the notes will add talking points. The  Miami Dade County Public School lessons support various investigations from the past to the present.

Connections to the Polish Black Virgin demonstrate the spread of culture and religious beliefs that traveled as countries were conquered.

Mirmac16
24
 

Goryeo Period Celadon Etched and Inlaid Decorative Techniques Translated into Watercolor Painting

Korean Goryeo period (918-1392) celadon  has famously elegant surface decorations. The delicate flowers, birds, and fish are incised with thin perfection into the clay pots and accented by inlaid white and black slip. Then the whole design is softly but beautifully highlighted by the glass like jade-green glaze. Using this six part lesson plan, students will research Goryeo celadon, compare its decorative techniques to other similar etched techniques, experiment with unique watercolor techniques to create similar effects, plan their own art work using a celadon like look, create their masterpiece, and evaluate whether they have achieved the desired goal of reproducing the look of Goryeo celadon decoration in watercolor. Completing this process, they will have created a painting that they could not have imagined before they began the exploration into  Goryeo celadon pottery decoration. In the first addendum students will be introduced to techniques using acrylic paste and pouring mediums which can produce an even more realistic appearance of Goyreo celadon incised and inlaid decoration.

Here in part 1. are some examples of green glazed, incised ceramics from Korea's Goryeo period. They are from the Freer Art Gallery's collection. Sort them into three groups according to their type of decoration. Then determine if the type of decoration is related to the time period in which they were created.  Next, take time to explore where this particular decoration style originated and how the Goryeo period potters in Korea perfected the technique. In part 2, compare these pieces to other types of art that are made using  similar etching techniques, such as scrimshaw and leather stamping, Then compare them to watercolor paintings of similar subjects to determine how to reproduce the Goryeo celadon look in watercolor painting. One goal of this learning lab is that students will make connections between different mediums and periods and in that process, discover new ways to use the mediums that they are familiar with. Later, in parts 3 and 4, students will be using the Goryeo celadon designs for inspiration when they practice new techniques and plan their own artwork which they will create in step five of the learning lab. In step 6 the students will evaluate their art works to see if they have achieved their goal of making a painting with the look of Goryeo celadon decoration. Addendum 1.  is not intended to be part of the watercolor lessons because of the time required to do the activities and the considerable mess involved, but it introduces the student to Acrylic mediums that can be used to make pictures that not only look like incised and inlaid Goryeo celadon, but are made with very similar techniques. #AsiaTeachers, #Watercolor, #GoryeoCeladon, #Ceramics, #NewAndCombinedPaintingTechniques. #Etching, #StudentArtProjects, #KoreanHistory, #ScratchedAndImpressedWatercolorPaper. #AcrylicPouringMedium, #AcrylicPasteMedium.

Elizabeth Anne Cox
88
 

Today's Modern Latino Art

Street smart and brash with a fresh approach! This collection has freedom to express yourself all within the confines of our present society.

Renee Mills
7
 

An Introduction to Japanese Painting

This collection was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction to Japanese painting for educators. It is a collection of artworks from the museum's permanent collection that draw from a wide variety of formats, styles, media, and subjects that represent many of the major trends in Japanese painting. Each image includes key information about the artwork, as well as ideas for class discussion, lesson components, and/or links to resources such as videos and articles which provide additional information about the artwork. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use. 

Keywords: Buddha, Hokusai, Mount Fuji, watercolor, bodhisattva, Fugen, Sōtatsu, cherry blossoms, seasons, Genji, crane, emakibyobukakemono, ukiyo-e, map, teacher, student, autumn, Japan, Japanese art, landscape, Edo period, Buddhism, Heian period, water, ocean, wave, boat, flower, insect, Muromachi period, river, surimono



Freer and Sackler Galleries
12
 

Using Visual Images to Determine What it Means to Be Human

Theme, Human Nature, Short Stories, ELA

Ellen Fisher
26
 

Socially Constructed Learning Through Art

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop empathy for others while increasing their cultural intelligence.

This collection was created to support teachers and administrators who wish to better understand the various cultures in their schools.  Using both Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and strategies from Amy E. Herman's Visual Intelligence book, participants will practice articulating cultural perspectives and communicating across differences using artwork and primary sources from the vast collections of the Smithsonian Learning Lab.  Participants will learn how to read a work of art, understand compositional hierarchy, and question what is missing.  The frameworks provided by Project Zero and Amy E. Herman will allow everyone, even those not accustomed to discussing art, a place from which to begin using art as a foundation for building culturally-responsive curriculum.

Participants will see museums as the cultural ambassadors that they are and ask whose culture is being represented and whose is missing and why.  Extending from this inquiry, participants will recognize the role schools play in nurturing and shaping the lives and identities of our students.

Julie Sawyer
24
 

Transcendentalism and National Parks

These visuals and supplementary materials are meant to augment a much larger American Literature unit (for grade 11) that covers Transcendentalism and authors such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and Frederick Law Olmsted.  This unit usually takes seven (7) 55-minute class periods.  I also utilize the first episode of Ken Burns's National Parks:  America's Best Idea.  

#SAAMteach

Cara Lane
6
 

The Civil Rights Movement and Persuasive Messages

In this learning resource collection, take a look at six persuasive messages that addressed civil rights issues in very different forms: a speech, a song, a button, a protest sign, a poster, and an artwork.
Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Destination Moon: NASA Art

Established in 1962, the NASA Artists Cooperation Program gave several artists unrestricted access to several NASA facilities. The goal was to communicate the emotional tone and the cultural significance of space exploration.

This collection uses the "Connect Extend Challenge" visible thinking strategy developed by Project Zero at Harvard University. This strategy encourages students to make connections between new ideas and prior knowledge. It also encourages them to make a personal connection to an artwork or topic.

This lesson helps teachers create connections between works of art and the study of space exploration, and to help teachers use art as a force for developing students’ critical thinking.  

Observe and discuss the first image as a class. Use the "Connect Extend Challenge" to discuss the image as a class. Ask the following: 

  • How is the artwork or object connected to something you know about?
  • What new ideas or impressions do you have that extended your thinking in new directions?
  • What is challenging or confusing? What do you wonder about?

Provide any background knowledge that enhances the conversation, using the metadata information about the NASA Artists Cooperation Program. 

Next, divide the students into 4 groups. Have them use the same questions to discuss one of the 4 images that deals the Apollo 11 launch. Wrap-up the discussion by having each group share out key thoughts and responses. Repeat the same process with the 4 images that represent Mission Control (note, Mission Control Images are from a selection of Apollo missions). 

Finally, students should choose one of the final 4 images to investigate, using the "Connect Extend Challenge" to guide their exploration. Their work could be shared verbally in a paired group, or written as a personal essay. 


Christina Ferwerda
13
 

Place, Community, and Representation in Photography

Guiding Questions:

How do photographers represent places and other people? What is the goal?

What are the ethical considerations in that representation for photographers?

How can we use images and photography to convey a message and persuade?

How have photographers throughout history used their images to create social change?

How can media, especially photography, raise awareness for social problems and challenges?


The lesson will provide examples of how analyzing and creating documentary photographs can foster deep thinking about global and local issues. Additionally, students will consider how to use digital photography and other digital media tools to communicate ideas or persuade an audience. Students will look at photos from social reformer Jacob Riis who documented the poverty and poor living conditions of immigrants to New York City. His work led to social change and reforms. His images also raise questions about the ethics obtaining photos and representation. The collection also includes images from the Smithsonian’s “Down These Mean Streets” exhibit. Students will consider a view of New York life through documentary street photography and how place and city life are represented in photography.


Time- 1-2 class periods with optional extension activities

Day 1:

Warm Up/ Engagement:

Have students do a chalk talk on chart paper on the following terms:

immigration, urbanization, sweatshop or factory, New York City

These concepts will be important for students to consider and have some familiarity with prior to discussing the work on Jacob Riis.

Looking Closely:

Next, show a photograph from Jacob Riis using the Project Zero Global Thinking Routine, "The 3 Ys" to analyze the story the image tells about living conditions for immigrant workers in New York City.

Students should consider why someone might be taking this photograph and who the intended audience might be.

Additionally, students might read some primary sources from that period written by Jacob Riis or others about the living conditions for immigrants on the Lower East Side of New York in the late 1800s.

Next, have students consider or take on different perspectives in the image by drawing the scene to include the photographer.

Have students read the Smithsonian article about Riis and watch a short video about his life and work. Alternatively, there’s an article from the Click! exhibit on Riis that students can read about how photography changes our awareness of poverty.

Exit Ticket/Reflection:

What did Jacob Riis intend to communicate through his photographs?  Do you think his images are respectful of immigrants and poor people? Why or why not?

Day 2

Today’s work focuses on exploring images from the “Down These Mean Streets: Community and Place in Urban Photography” exhibit. Allow students time to explore the gallery and identify photos that are meaningful to them.

In small groups, have students work in groups of two or three to analyze an image of their choosing in the collection using the “3 Ys” routine. Have students share their findings with the group.

As a reflection, have students consider some of the guiding questions about how photographers choose to represent places and communities.

What associations does the viewer have with these photographs?

What mood is created with these photographs?

How might you be able to create a sense of place with photography?

Extensions:

Additional resources related to Jacob Riis:

Library of Congress Exhibit

Magic Lantern Presentation from Riis

Jacob A. Riis: Revealing New York’s Other Half Educator Resource Guide

  • Have students complete their own documentary photo essay on their own neighborhood or community.
  • Have students read excerpts from ‘Down These Mean Streets’ and connect them to the images in the collection.
  • Join the Out of Eden Walk community and have students document their neighborhood and gather stories.
Allie Wilding
24
 

Puzzle Looking Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery

In this collection, we look at portraiture through the lens of the puzzle activity. This looking strategy allows participants to start with a small puzzle piece of a portrait to consider the details before looking at the whole object. This activity challenges participants to determine what they think they know and what they wonder about a portrait based on verbal descriptions of the puzzle pieces.

Visually rich portraits, with both objects and setting, are most effective when using this strategy.

Included in this collection are examples of portraits National Portrait Gallery educators have had success with when faciltiating the puzzle activity while teaching in the galleries: George Washington, Men of Progress, Shimomura Crossing the Delaware
Briana White
10
 

Running Fence

This teaching collection includes images and video of Running Fence, a work of installation art by Christo and Jean Claude. Included at the end is a lesson plan that engages students in analysis of Running Fence and details the steps for a student-designed installation art work at their school.

Learning goals include:
• Define installation art
• Analyze the process and results of the work of Jean-Claude and Christo to develop Running Fence
• Use the design process to develop a proposal for an installation art piece
• Use persuasive speaking skills to pitch your plan to the relevant stakeholders in your school community
• Plan and execute a piece of installation art on your school grounds, working cooperatively with a team
Kate Harris
46
 

Giant Panda Baby - Video resources to complement nonfiction book

A collection to complement "Welcome, BaoBao," a Smithsonian nonfiction book published by Penguin Young Readers, 2015. The book presents facts about pandas and their care at the National Zoo and describes their natural and zoo habitats. The videos in this collection allow children to see the baby panda in motion, hear the noises it makes, and find out what its fur feels like. The video "Sleepy Panda" shows the animal's habitat in China, with a map to indicate where it is on the continent. The final resource connects to the National Zoo's live "panda cam."
Michelle Smith
7
 

The Civil Rights Movement and Persuasive Messages

In this learning resource collection, take a look at six persuasive messages that addressed civil rights issues in very different forms: a speech, a song, a button, a protest sign, a poster, and an artwork.
Kim Palermo
10