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Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initiative: English/Language Arts Standards
 

Design It Yourself: Design an Expressive Letterform

Follow along to design an expressive letterform inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Communication Design, Jennifer Morla

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

This playlist on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write an argumentative essay answering one of three questions.

National Museum of American History
59
 

Labor Organizing in the US

This playlist on Labor Organizing in the U.S. is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, written, and audio texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print PDF versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create work of art that represents work people are doing today to create change in a current social issue.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In, Tasks, and Guides).
  • Summative assessments are respresented by a circle (Quiz and Final Task).
  • PDF versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 


Matt Hart
66
 

Labor Organizing in the US

This playlist on Labor Organizing in the U.S. is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, written, and audio texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print PDF versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create work of art that represents work people are doing today to create change in a current social issue.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In, Tasks, and Guides).
  • Summative assessments are respresented by a circle (Quiz and Final Task).
  • PDF versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 


National Museum of American History
66
 

Narrative Writing

Create a nice narrative writing that is very fun...

Ansley Herndon
0
 

Writing Flash Fiction from Art, Part 1

In this Collection, students will choose art to help generate a piece of original flash fiction. 

Flash fiction - which is limited to 750-1500 words - is uniquely useful to developing writers because it allows them to practice their writing skills over a number of shorter pieces.  The artwork is of great purpose to creating Flash Fiction because it can provide a writer with three of the five essential elements - Setting, Situation, Sensory Detail - as identified by  Katey Schultz of the Interlochen College of the Creative Arts.   Another useful resource is found here.

This assignment is the first of a series of assignments in which students develop Flash Fiction from art pieces, giving them the opportunity to develop their skills over time, then revise and edit and submit a final piece.

Julie Harding
32
 

Writing Flash Fiction from Artwork Part II

In this Collection, students will choose art to help generate a second piece of original flash fiction. 

Flash fiction - which is limited to 750-1500 words - is uniquely useful to developing writers because it allows them to practice their writing skills over a number of shorter pieces.  The artwork is of great purpose to creating Flash Fiction because it can provide a writer with three of the five essential elements - Setting, Situation, Sensory Detail - as identified by  Katey Schultz of the Interlochen College of the Creative Arts.   Another useful resource is found here.


Julie Harding
38
 

World War II on the Home Front: Civic Responsibility

Lesson based on posters that encouraged American citizens to contribute to the war effort. Students consider the importance of volunteerism in a free society.
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
4
 

The Museum Idea


This 1976 issue of Art to Zoo offers ideas for activities before a classroom visit to a museum.
Included is a student chart on museum careers and tips on introducing students to abstract art.
Click the PDF icon to download.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
5
 

Telling Edward Hopper's Untold Stories

This lesson was designed for the 6th grade language arts class. The purpose is to review with students the key elements of a story and to position them to create a short story based on one of the works of Edward Hopper. Our end products will be collected into an ebook of Hopper’s works and the possible backstories behind them as written by the students.
In the class meeting prior to these activities the students will have participated in a videoconference with a SAAM representative who will explain the ways an artist uses color, shape, line, form, etc. to convey meaning. Earlier in the year, students will have been exposed to elements of a story. Their understanding of these will be reviewed and reinforced through these activities.
Three days of activities outlined in the Lesson Concept document. They include activities related to close looking and incorporate the Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) of "See, Think, Wonder" (STW), the "I Used to Think...But Now I Think" strategy, and the "Collaborative Poem" strategy (CP).
Keeping the middle school students' needs and interests in mind, I have incorporated group work --both large and small groups-- and hands-on activities that respect their need to move around.

Peggy Veltri
21
 

Decades of Transformation: Bridging the 1920s and 30's

Each item in this collection reflects the changing culture of America between the two World Wars. As we read The Great Gatsby and Of Mice and Men, consider how these pieces show the change of mindset across the decades.

Your task: select 5 artifacts and write a short paragraph for each saying how the object relates to 1) the era it is from, 2) to two texts, and 3) the other objects in you collection. Do not answer the three items like a list; rather, think about having your entire paragraph answer these questions: Why did I choose this object for this collection? What does it add to the whole? How can I interpret this object for the visitors of my gallery?

For your writing voice, sound authoritative, like a museum placard (those little signs next to objects). You do not need direct text evidence, but you do need to reference one or both of the texts.

Jacob Carlson
29
 

Investigating a Place: The Pacific Northwest

What defines a place? Is it its people? Economic life? Physical characteristics?

Examine this collection of images from or about the Pacific Northwest (loosely defined as Washington and Oregon states and British Columbia) to answer these questions: What are its unique set of physical and cultural conditions? How do these physical and cultural conditions interact? How does the economy of the PNW connect to its culture and geography? What are the consequences of human activity on the cultural and physical landscape?

Ask students individually or in small groups to create a collection in Learning Lab to represent the physical and cultural characteristics of another place (city, region, state). Using these collections, ask students to write summary statements describing the unique human and physical characteristics of places researched. Discuss student collections and what makes each place unique.

Tags: Portland, Seattle, Oregon, Washington, Vancouver, Native Americans, American Indians, grunge, space needle

Kate Harris
38
 

Creative Writing Exercise: Photograph Analysis for Descriptive Writing

This collection is adapted from a teacher's original collection of seven photographs of a single person, spanning several decades of the 20th century. In this activity, students can express their unique responses to the photographs in the collection by writing stories inspired by the people in them. Before they put their imaginations to work, students will have a chance to get to know the photographs by observing them closely, making a list of details, and writing a description of each. Such an exercise will help them understand the value of careful observation as a precursor to descriptive and creative writing.
Ashley Naranjo
14
 

How did the growth of railroads impact the economy, politics, and society in the period after the Civil War?

This assignment will help you respond to the question: How did the growth of railroads impact the economy, politics, and society in the period after the Civil War? As you work through the activity, you will want to complete the organizational chart with your analysis of each artifact or resource. When you are finished, write your essay response using information from your chart. You will submit the file to your teacher in the format they have requested.
Kate Harris
14